I'm the pyrographer from Greenwood Creations Studios, and this is my personal page.

This blog is often NSFW.

 

realsocialskills:

youneedacat:

autieblesam:

[Image is a poster explaining briefly the origin and meaning of green, yellow, and red interaction signal badges, referred to above as Color Communication Badges.]
deducecanoe:

justsjwthings:

oldamongdreams:

greencarnations:

CAN WE DO THESE AT CONS

SECONDED.

if youre not autistic or suffer from an actual disorder, dont use these. its not cute.

er… you know a lot of autistic people go to conventions, right? And people with social anxiety disorders and panic disorders? Shit if I could get away with using this at work I would. 

Hello there, justsjwthings.
I would like to introduce myself.  I refer to myself as Sam Thomas, though my legal name and how a lot of people know me is Matthew.  I am officially diagnosed autistic.
Over one week in June 2013 (last summer), I was in Washington, DC for an autism conference called the Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) summer leadership program run by the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network for autistic college students.
If you have any question as to the truth of this, I would like to direct your attention to this YouTube video that ASAN produced promoting the above-mentioned conference.  I appear as the first person in the video and you can find more images of my face on my blog.
At this conference, not only did we use these communication badges pictured above, but we actually had the opportunity to meet Jim Sinclair, the inventor of these badges.
During the part of the conference in which Jim Sinclair gave us a history of Autism Network International (ANI)—which they were a co-founder of—they talked to us about the establishment of this particular piece of assistive technology.  Basically, it was a simple idea that seemed to fit a need and quickly became very popular among many autistic spaces for it’s practicality and ease of use.
The conference it originated from is called Autreat and is held annually by ANI. This is an autism conference that accepts Autistics and Cousins (ACs)—that is, anyone diagnosed or otherwise self-identifying with any disorder autistic or similar that may share a number of autistic traits.
There was a need.  The need was met.  This is how we can safely assume most technology either emerges or becomes popular.
We also talked about something called Universal Design and the Curb-Cutter Effect.  The Curb-Cutter Effect is when something to fit a specific need is found to create convenience in a broader area than intended.  Curb cuts allowing for wheelchair accessibility to sidewalks proved to also be convenient to anyone who may have trouble with steps or even simply a mother with a baby stroller or maybe a child with a wagon.  This is a desirable outcome with disability rights advocacy as creating convenience for non-disabled people often makes the assistive technology easier to advocate for.
In this sense, these colored communication badges could serve that Curb-Cutter effect.  Not only would this be perfectly acceptable for non-disabled people to use for convenience, but would also help to increase their effectiveness and convenience for those of us who need them.  Here are a few examples:
Increased popularity makes the colored communication badges more easily recognizable to the general public, making them as effective outside the above-mentioned autism conferences as inside.
Increase in demand would create increase in supply and availability, likely making these available to pretty much anyone and even being included with, say, the name tags you are required to wear at most cons.
In addition to these helping people recognize the communication state of the wearer, the wearer will be able to recognize whom they can feel more comfortable to approach.
Increased popularity would make these badges more acceptable for public use and less alienating to those who would wear them frequently.
This is not something that we are completely incapable of surviving without; this is something that was convenient and made our lives a lot easier.  If that can be easily shared with the general public, then what purpose does it serve not to share it?
Thank you for reading.

youneedacat said:
All that plus —
It diminishes the entire world to treat things like this as some kind of proprietary thing owned by people with certain disabilities that nobody else gets to do.  I’m getting really fucking sick of reading posts that treat assistive tech as something owned by disabled people that nobody else gets to use for any reason.  Nothing, nothing at all, nothing whatsoever, is served by that attitude, other than maybe people’s egos.  give it a rest.

realsocialskills said:
Agreed. I’m pretty sure that in this case the person who made that claim is actually a troll, but I’ve seen people say stuff like that and actually mean it.
I’ve been trying to write about that, but it’s very difficult to write clearly.

My seven year old son’s on the spectrum, and one thing he has a very hard time with when we take him to cons (I’m a vendor, so it’s kind of my job to attend) is all of the people approaching him and speaking to him. He loves to dress up, but people want to interact with him and compliment him on his cosplay, and that gets very overwhelming for him very quickly. Something like this would help him immensely! And, I know that for myself, with anxiety/social anxiety issues of my own, this would also help me immensely. Also, as someone who has been harassed and gotten unwanted/unwelcomed attention based solely and obviously on my appearance on numerous occasions, I know that this would come in handy for a lot of female cosplayers, too (I can only speak for the females, as I identify/present as as a female.)I imagine it would be helpful for others in other situations, as well. Why not use communication tools like this?

realsocialskills:

youneedacat:

autieblesam:

[Image is a poster explaining briefly the origin and meaning of green, yellow, and red interaction signal badges, referred to above as Color Communication Badges.]

deducecanoe:

justsjwthings:

oldamongdreams:

greencarnations:

CAN WE DO THESE AT CONS

SECONDED.

if youre not autistic or suffer from an actual disorder, dont use these. its not cute.

er… you know a lot of autistic people go to conventions, right? And people with social anxiety disorders and panic disorders? Shit if I could get away with using this at work I would. 

Hello there, justsjwthings.

I would like to introduce myself.  I refer to myself as Sam Thomas, though my legal name and how a lot of people know me is Matthew.  I am officially diagnosed autistic.

Over one week in June 2013 (last summer), I was in Washington, DC for an autism conference called the Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) summer leadership program run by the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network for autistic college students.

If you have any question as to the truth of this, I would like to direct your attention to this YouTube video that ASAN produced promoting the above-mentioned conference.  I appear as the first person in the video and you can find more images of my face on my blog.

At this conference, not only did we use these communication badges pictured above, but we actually had the opportunity to meet Jim Sinclair, the inventor of these badges.

During the part of the conference in which Jim Sinclair gave us a history of Autism Network International (ANI)—which they were a co-founder of—they talked to us about the establishment of this particular piece of assistive technology.  Basically, it was a simple idea that seemed to fit a need and quickly became very popular among many autistic spaces for it’s practicality and ease of use.

The conference it originated from is called Autreat and is held annually by ANI. This is an autism conference that accepts Autistics and Cousins (ACs)—that is, anyone diagnosed or otherwise self-identifying with any disorder autistic or similar that may share a number of autistic traits.

There was a need.  The need was met.  This is how we can safely assume most technology either emerges or becomes popular.

We also talked about something called Universal Design and the Curb-Cutter Effect.  The Curb-Cutter Effect is when something to fit a specific need is found to create convenience in a broader area than intended.  Curb cuts allowing for wheelchair accessibility to sidewalks proved to also be convenient to anyone who may have trouble with steps or even simply a mother with a baby stroller or maybe a child with a wagon.  This is a desirable outcome with disability rights advocacy as creating convenience for non-disabled people often makes the assistive technology easier to advocate for.

In this sense, these colored communication badges could serve that Curb-Cutter effect.  Not only would this be perfectly acceptable for non-disabled people to use for convenience, but would also help to increase their effectiveness and convenience for those of us who need them.  Here are a few examples:

  • Increased popularity makes the colored communication badges more easily recognizable to the general public, making them as effective outside the above-mentioned autism conferences as inside.
  • Increase in demand would create increase in supply and availability, likely making these available to pretty much anyone and even being included with, say, the name tags you are required to wear at most cons.
  • In addition to these helping people recognize the communication state of the wearer, the wearer will be able to recognize whom they can feel more comfortable to approach.
  • Increased popularity would make these badges more acceptable for public use and less alienating to those who would wear them frequently.

This is not something that we are completely incapable of surviving without; this is something that was convenient and made our lives a lot easier.  If that can be easily shared with the general public, then what purpose does it serve not to share it?

Thank you for reading.

youneedacat said:

All that plus —

It diminishes the entire world to treat things like this as some kind of proprietary thing owned by people with certain disabilities that nobody else gets to do.  I’m getting really fucking sick of reading posts that treat assistive tech as something owned by disabled people that nobody else gets to use for any reason.  Nothing, nothing at all, nothing whatsoever, is served by that attitude, other than maybe people’s egos.  give it a rest.

realsocialskills said:

Agreed. I’m pretty sure that in this case the person who made that claim is actually a troll, but I’ve seen people say stuff like that and actually mean it.

I’ve been trying to write about that, but it’s very difficult to write clearly.

My seven year old son’s on the spectrum, and one thing he has a very hard time with when we take him to cons (I’m a vendor, so it’s kind of my job to attend) is all of the people approaching him and speaking to him. He loves to dress up, but people want to interact with him and compliment him on his cosplay, and that gets very overwhelming for him very quickly. Something like this would help him immensely!

And, I know that for myself, with anxiety/social anxiety issues of my own, this would also help me immensely.

Also, as someone who has been harassed and gotten unwanted/unwelcomed attention based solely and obviously on my appearance on numerous occasions, I know that this would come in handy for a lot of female cosplayers, too (I can only speak for the females, as I identify/present as as a female.)

I imagine it would be helpful for others in other situations, as well.

Why not use communication tools like this?

iwanttoberecycled:

denlart:


Artist Jane Perkins obtains her inspiration in found objects. She uses anything from toys, shells, buttons, beads, jewelry etc. as material for her re-interpreted contemporary art.…[unknowneditors][denlArt]


I want to be your masterpiece. 

iwanttoberecycled:

denlart:

image

image

image

image

Artist Jane Perkins obtains her inspiration in found objects. She uses anything from toys, shells, buttons, beads, jewelry etc. as material for her re-interpreted contemporary art.…[unknowneditors][denlArt]

I want to be your masterpiece. 

iwanttoberecycled:

archiemcphee:

Nirit Levav Packer is an Israeli sculptress who uses old bicycle chains and gears, and sometimes other parts as well, to create delightful and impressively realistic dog sculptures.

Thus far she has made 25 life-size dog sculptures using recycled bike parts. Click here to view them all.

[via Design Taxi]

I want to be man’s best friend.

the-real-seebs:

hussarviking:

NEVER trust an adult who won’t apologize to a child

Wow. I’d never seen it put that way, but. Wow. That is a really good piece of advice.

(Source: thunreswine)

benpaddon:

The phrase “words to live by” gets thrown around often these days, but these are absolutely words to live by.

(Source: c-mines)

The US Government: We're not going to make it federally mandatory for people to get paid a wage they can actually live off of

The US Government: If people want to make a living, they'll just have to work 16+ hours a day

The US Government: And if their kids end up disenfranchised because of a lack of parental involvement, well that's not our problem

The US Government: In fact, what is our problem is creating a system that will funnel these disenfranchised youth into our prison system so they can work for corporations (that promise us money) for damn near free

The US Government: If they don't want to fall victim to this system, then they can seek higher education

The US Government: Except such an education will be inaccessible to most disenfranchised people and skewed in favor of the financially stable and white people

The US Government: And we're not going to make intervention programs like sex education and conflict resolution federally mandatory, because that's the parent's job

The US Government: The parent who is working 16 hours a day

In social justice, there’s this absurd meme (that I’ve been guilty of myself) is that we are the “voice for the voiceless,” but that’s not right. The oppressed are not voiceless – they’re just not being listened to.

Dianna Anderson, of Be the Change, at Rachel Held Evans’ “Ask a Feminist” (via emm-in-sem)

Wooo, I like this. 

(via iamateenagefeminist)

Perfect quote is perfect.

(via cand86)

Gonna print this out and stick it on my mirror. Keep that shit in check.

(via ishkwaakiiwan)

Or that one is “GIVING” a voice to a marginalized person. Which is very problematic as well. Having a voice is different to not being heard.

(via newwavefeminism)

And always remember that our ‘voices’ are not always spoken word, there are many ways to communicate and they should all be respected

(via silversarcasm)

(Source: dandelionbreaks)

Prodding poor parents to get even more involved is really just a callous disregard for the fact that parental involvement–while ideal–is a luxury that not all families can afford.

Melissa Harris-Perry on MSNBC after Tennessee proposed a bill that would take money away from the state’s poorest families if their children fail to make the grade in school. (via msnbc)

naamahdarling:

eatshitwhiteboy:

blackpowerisforblackmen:


Shanesha Taylor was arrested on March 20th by the Scottsdale Police for leaving her children ages 2 and 6 months in her car while she was interviewed for a job. Ms. Taylor was homeless and could not access any child care. Her desperation to provide for herself and her children and her lack of options led her to take drastic measures in search of employment. Ms. Taylor needs support & help rather than incarceration and a criminal record that will surely decrease her chances to provide for her children in the future. We ask that Maricopa County use common-sense and provide support for Ms. Taylor and her children rather than punishment.
Shanesha Taylor is still in jail pending a $9,000 bond.

Help drop the child abuse charges against Shanesha Taylor by signing this petition at change.org. Here’s the link: http://www.change.org/petitions/bill-montgomery-drop-the-child-abuse-charges-against-shanesha-taylor?recruiter=13739587&utm_campaign=twitter_link_action_box&utm_medium=twitter&utm_source=share_petition

SIGNAL BOOST

SIGNAL BOOST THE SHIT OUT OF THIS.

naamahdarling:

eatshitwhiteboy:

blackpowerisforblackmen:

Shanesha Taylor was arrested on March 20th by the Scottsdale Police for leaving her children ages 2 and 6 months in her car while she was interviewed for a job. Ms. Taylor was homeless and could not access any child care. Her desperation to provide for herself and her children and her lack of options led her to take drastic measures in search of employment. Ms. Taylor needs support & help rather than incarceration and a criminal record that will surely decrease her chances to provide for her children in the future. We ask that Maricopa County use common-sense and provide support for Ms. Taylor and her children rather than punishment.

Shanesha Taylor is still in jail pending a $9,000 bond.

Help drop the child abuse charges against Shanesha Taylor by signing this petition at change.org. Here’s the link: http://www.change.org/petitions/bill-montgomery-drop-the-child-abuse-charges-against-shanesha-taylor?recruiter=13739587&utm_campaign=twitter_link_action_box&utm_medium=twitter&utm_source=share_petition


SIGNAL BOOST

SIGNAL BOOST THE SHIT OUT OF THIS.

gryffin-dyke:

witchyblackchick:

alinatotheleft:

flexblr:

youknowimgood4it:

Taken from reddit but it can’t be stressed enough

Making fun of fat people at the gym is like making fun of sick people at the hospital.

"Lol wow you’re doing chemotherapy? Clearly you suck at it if you still have cancer."

But fat is not a problem to be fixed tho. I smell good fatty vs. bad fatty all up in this.

gryffin-dyke:

witchyblackchick:

alinatotheleft:

flexblr:

youknowimgood4it:

Taken from reddit but it can’t be stressed enough

Making fun of fat people at the gym is like making fun of sick people at the hospital.

"Lol wow you’re doing chemotherapy? Clearly you suck at it if you still have cancer."

But fat is not a problem to be fixed tho. I smell good fatty vs. bad fatty all up in this.

image

flavorpill:

What happened on last night’s “Game of Thrones” was deeply disturbing, but the director of the episode seems to disagree. What makes it more disturbing is that it was written completely differently in George R.R. Martin’s books - meaning the show decided to take things to a much darker place intentionally. 
What Happened on ‘Game of Thrones’ Last Night Was Awful — So Why Doesn’t the Episode’s Director Understand That?

Dude. I didn’t see it, but I love the books, and… yeaaaaaah, that’s kind of a VERY BIG AND IMPORTANT CHANGE TO MAKE.

flavorpill:

What happened on last night’s “Game of Thrones” was deeply disturbing, but the director of the episode seems to disagree. What makes it more disturbing is that it was written completely differently in George R.R. Martin’s books - meaning the show decided to take things to a much darker place intentionally. 

What Happened on ‘Game of Thrones’ Last Night Was Awful — So Why Doesn’t the Episode’s Director Understand That?

Dude. I didn’t see it, but I love the books, and… yeaaaaaah, that’s kind of a VERY BIG AND IMPORTANT CHANGE TO MAKE.

shoomlah:

Oh, Elsa.  What are we going to do with you.

Frozen is purportedly set in the 1830’s-40’s, but I’ve been obsessed with finding a style that could marry her coronation gown with her ice gown more seamlessly; the open robes you see during the Regency era, including those being worn by Scandinavian royalty at the time, seemed a particularly apt analog for her… weird underarm-cape.  Thing.  You also see her mom wearing something very similar for something like ten years, so it’s not a huge stretch to think it could be a popular look in Arendelle.  THAT’S MY EXCUSE.

I initially designed this for her coronation, but I figured it wouldn’t hurt to explore how that same silhouette might work with her ice gown as well.  Someday, theoretically, I would love to do a more literally iced-up version of her gown, but I figured the alternate colour way would be a nice middle ground to strike.

-C

( See the rest of the series HERE , and check out the FAQ HERE